cosmetic dentistry

Smile Makeovers

  1. What is a Smile Makeover?
  2. How do you know if someone is a candidate for a Smile Makeover?
  3. Is it realistic to expect that I will look like a model in those magazines after getting a smile makeover?
  4. What steps should I take to prepare for my smile makeover?

Dental Veneers

  1. What are veneers (aka porcelain veneers, laminates)?
  2. What is involved with getting veneers?
  3. I am over 30 years old and have crowded and crooked front teeth. Is there a way to fix them without having to wear braces?

Teeth Whitening

  1. What is Teeth Whitening (Teeth Bleaching)?
  2. Do Whitening toothpastes, rinses, flosses and chewing gums actually work?
  3. Is tooth whitening safe? Does whitening harm your tooth’s enamel?
  4. Which is a better way to whiten your teeth... using an In-Office or At-Home whitening system?
  5. Is it better to wear my home whitening trays during the day or when I sleep at night?
  6. What is the difference between an over-the-counter whitening strip and pre-formed trays versus a custom tray made in the dental office?
  7. How long does teeth whitening last before I have to do it again?
  8. Who are the best candidates for teeth whitening?
  9. Do I need to see my dentist first for a cleaning and exam before scheduling a whitening session?
  10. How to I prevent my teeth from becoming too white?
  11. Are there other alternatives to improving my smile other than whitening my teeth?
  12. I have whitened my teeth before, but it doesn’t look like those actors on TV. What are they doing to get their teeth so white?
  13. What things should I avoid doing after teeth whitening and for how long?
  14. Is there such a thing as over-whitening teeth?
  15. How old does one have to be in order to have whitening performed on them?
  16. Can I still whiten with sensitive teeth? And what can I do to make my teeth more comfortable?
  17. Does everyone get sensitivity when you whiten your teeth? And how long does the sensitivity last once you get it?
  18. When I used my home whitening trays my gums got irritated? Is that normal?
  19. After I whitened my teeth, I noticed a bunch of white, blotchy spots all over my teeth... what is that? And what should I do to get rid of them?
  20. I have white spots on my teeth, will whitening still work?
  21. Why do teeth turn yellow?
  22. I saw my dentist for an In-Office teeth whitening, but my teeth didn’t get much lighter. Does this happen to a lot of people? And are there other ways to whiten my teeth?
  23. Do toothpastes with colour stain your teeth?

Enamel Reshaping

  1. What is enamel reshaping (enameloplasty)?
  2. Is enamel reshaping harmful to the teeth?
  3. Is everyone a candidate for enamel reshaping?
  4. Do teeth become more sensitive after enamel reshaping?

Dental Bonding

  1. What is bonding?
  2. How long does tooth bonding last?
  3. Why do teeth get discoloured?

Smile Makeoverstop

Question:
What is a Smile Makeover?
Answer:
Teeth can tell your age… that is, only if you let them. A cosmetic smile makeover can subtract years from your appearance. This smile makeover involves non-surgical modifications, where the smile is broadened, teeth are brightened, and the lips are made to appear fuller. As people get older, their lips usually lose elasticity and become thin, wrinkles develop, and their face begins to show their age.
Smile design takes into account the entire picture, where the lips and gums act as the frame for the esthetically enhanced teeth. Just as different frames complement different paintings, the design and modifications of one's smile are considered on an individual basis. The focus is to improve the entire smile. Fixing just one or two teeth is like renovating one or two houses on a block. It makes everything else look worse. Esthetic dentistry is not patchwork; it is important to concentrate on the entire smile.
The dental profession is currently undergoing an esthetic revolution, where new materials, techniques and equipment have enabled the dental practitioner to produce high quality, highly esthetic restorations that are predictable and minimally invasive. While some people may turn to their plastic surgeon for a face-lift, the cosmetic smile makeover may eliminate the need for that in some cases.

Question:
How do you know if someone is a candidate for a Smile Makeover?
Answer:
In order to know if someone is a candidate for a Smile Makeover the dentist must first evaluate their total face and listen to their expectations. The shape and design of each patient's teeth should be tailored to that individual, because each person's facial contours are different, and these distinct characteristics help to distinguish one's character. The starting point of smile design is determining the facial midline. The midpoint between the two front teeth should line up with the midline of the face. The amount of tooth and gums that are revealed differ from patient to patient depending on phonetics (what their smile looks like when sounding certain letters) and smile position. For example, if you were to draw a line between the corners of the mouth when smiling, you will find that a youthful smile will show 75 - 100% of the front teeth below that line.
Different types of smiles can be created just by altering the planes in which the edges of the teeth line up, and by keeping those edges straight or rounding them off. For example, someone who wants a more aggressive look may have the teeth line up straight across without any soft curves, whereas someone who wants a more playful appearance may want the two front teeth slightly longer than the teeth directly next to them, and the canine teeth (2 teeth over from the front teeth) would be a little longer and with a more curved point. Just by rounding off the sharp edges of teeth one can create a softer, more feminine appearance. People can also correct that sunken in look where the teeth narrow as they go back by enhancing their smile to fill those dark spaces in the corners of the mouth.
Additionally, esthetic dentistry based upon one’s own facial features may dictate the need to include different shapes, inclinations and rotations of teeth. Some people just may need more prominent canines or more prominent centrals. Maybe the laterals need to be rotated to catch the light in just the right way. Old photographs should be used to help find out what characteristics about your original smile you liked and disliked. Then, when appropriate, the dentist can give you some of the characteristics that you liked from the photos you brought in to make the teeth feel more like your own.

Question:
Is it realistic to expect that I will look like a model in those magazines after getting a smile makeover?
Answer:
When dentists ask their patients to bring in a photo of a smile that they like, and they bring in a photo of a supermodel and say ‘I want to look like this’, is that being realistic? What is it about a model that makes them so photogenic? The reason models photograph so well is because their faces are perfectly symmetrical. If you bisect their faces, you would find that their left and right sides do, in fact, match up. If a dentist took a photograph of all their patients’ faces, and then drew a line and bisected it right down the center, they would find that 95% of the time their right side will not match up with their left side. Cosmetic dentists are often taught to make teeth that are symmetrical. But unless their patient has a perfectly symmetric face, they would be doing that patient a disservice in giving them perfectly symmetric teeth. The dental practitioner must take into account the lip curtain, the tilt of the upper jaw, the bone structure, etc., when making the final restorations. Otherwise, they are just placing something completely symmetrical within an asymmetrical frame, which would have the adverse effect of making the teeth stand out.

Question:
What steps should I take to prepare for my smile makeover?
Answer:
The first thing you should do when planning for a smile makeover is to make sure your dentist takes the time to listen to your desires and to what you like and don’t like about your smile. It sounds so simple, but many dentists rush through or ignore this step completely. Your dentist should take digital photographs, perform digital imaging, and create an esthetic wax up that can serve as a template for the temporary restorations. You may wish to meet with the ceramist for a cosmetic consultation and custom shade selection. Feel free to bring in photos of some smiles that you like. The more information you give the ceramist, the more you can guide your dentist to create what will meet or exceed your expectations. It is also recommended to meet with the recommended specialists to help determine if Orthodontics or gum reshaping is necessary to enhance your smile even more.

What is orthodontics?

Orthodontics is the process to correct teeth and jaws. In simple you can say that it is the process of the treatment of improper bites and crooked teeth. Our orthodontist have well expertise in straightening crooked teeth.

Dental Veneerstop

Question:
What are veneers (aka porcelain veneers, laminates)?
Answer:
Veneers are thin pieces of porcelain or resin material that gets bonded (glued) to the front of your teeth. For teeth that are chipped, severely discolored, crowded, spaced, rotated or misshaped in any way, these veneers can create a durable and beautiful smile for many years to come. Veneers are difficult to stain, making them popular for people seeking a perfect smile. There are two types of veneers:

    • Porcelain (indirect) veneers, which must first be created to custom fit your teeth in a dental laboratory and require two visits with your dentist. Porcelain veneers may vary in price from $900-$2,500 per tooth and last from 10 to 15 years or more. While more expensive than other alternatives, porcelain veneers usually offer a more precise, realistic color match to your surrounding teeth.

  • Composite (direct) veneers, in which composite resins are bonded to your tooth in a single visit. Composite veneers cost significantly less, around $250-400 per tooth, but usually need to be maintained or replaced sooner than the porcelain version.

Question:
What is involved with getting veneers?
Answer:
Your dentist must first determine if you are a good candidate for veneers, by taking all the necessary diagnostic records (such as impressions, bite registration, digital photographs, x-rays, etc.) Your original models of your teeth should then be built up in wax to ideal esthetics to see what could be accomplished with the porcelain and how much tooth structure would need to be reduced in order to achieve this ideal wax-up version. Then local anesthetic injections are given, the teeth are prepared, impressions are taken, and temporaries are made. There is an advantage to having temporaries made, and that is the patient has a chance to take this crude version of their final restorations on a test run to see if they are comfortable when speaking, smiling and speaking. If they are not, they have the ability to have them adjusted and modified before the final ones are made. Within a couple of weeks the veneers are bonded onto the prepared teeth, and polished and adjusted.

Question:
I am over 30 years old and have crowded and crooked front teeth. Is there a way to fix them without having to wear braces?
Answer:
Yes, there are a few ways to correct your smile without having to wear braces or retainers. Among your options are Porcelain Veneers, Teeth Bonding and Enamel Shaping. In mild cases of teeth crowding, the more conservative approach is Enamel Shaping, which involves modifying the shape of your teeth by removing or contouring enamel (the hard, white outer layer of a tooth) to create the illusion that your teeth are more balanced in their appearance. This process does not require anesthesia, and the results are noticeable immediately. Keep in mind that the removal of enamel is an irreversible process, and may also require additional bonding to enhance the appearance of your teeth. Porcelain Laminate Veneers, in my opinion, are the restoration of choice to correct poorly shaped or slightly crooked teeth for those individuals who do not wish to experience orthodontics. Veneers are thin, custom-made shells made of tooth-colored materials which are bonded to the prepared teeth to enhance the esthetics of one's smile. This, too, is an irreversible process because a small amount of enamel is usually removed to accommodate the thickness of the porcelain shell. Veneers are used, with tremendous success, for treating gaps and dark spaces between teeth, for teeth that are stained, and for teeth that are worn or eroded at the gum line due to hard tooth brushing. Many of the actors and entertainment personalities who appear to have "picture perfect" teeth have used veneers as a more permanent way to whiten and straighten their teeth. The procedure usually requires 2 or 3 appointments, and the results will make a dramatic difference in the way you look and feel about yourself.

Teeth Whiteningtop

Question:
What is Teeth Whitening (Teeth Bleaching)?
Answer:
An estimated ten million Americans will spend a whopping 2 billion dollars on tooth whitening products and services this year to try to achieve that perfect “Hollywood” smile. Tooth whitening is the most common cosmetic service provided by dentists. There are also a growing number of over-the-counter tooth whitening products available as well. Teeth Whitening is a way to reverse the signs of age in teeth, and remove the years of cumulative stain from coffee, wine, soda, teriyaki sauce, tomato sauce, etc. These unsightly stains can be removed quickly, safely, and with minimal discomfort utilizing In-Office whitening systems, custom home trays, and over the counter products. You should first have a dental exam to find out which treatment, or combination of treatments is right for you.

Question:
Do Whitening toothpastes, rinses, flosses and chewing gums actually work?
Answer:
Over-the-counter whitening products such as the whitening toothpastes, rinses, flosses and whitening chewing gums are relatively ineffective at best, and some of these whitening pastes can be very abrasive, and actually cause damage to the enamel. Brushing with whitening toothpaste removes the extrinsic stains by mechanical means; little to no change in colour actually takes place. The ‘whitening’ is deceiving on these products, because if it rubs off a little extrinsic stain, does that mean the teeth have been whitened? You need a bleaching agent, such as carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide, in order to intrinsically whiten the teeth. These whitening agents must remain in contact with the enamel for a certain period of time in order to be effective. Even toothpastes that claim to have these agents are not very effective, because they have a mild concentration of peroxide and they are not in contact for long enough duration to make any difference.

Question:
Is tooth whitening safe? Does whitening harm your tooth’s enamel?
Answer:
Tooth bleaching has proven to be a safe and effective way of achieving a more youthful and healthy-looking smile. The safety and effectiveness of this procedure is directly related to the dosage given, the frequency and duration of treatment, the concentration and type of the material used, and the type of tray or system utilized. Like anything, it can be abused, and cause adverse results. During the time that you whiten, the fluoride-rich layer of the enamel is broken down and the teeth become more porous, making them more susceptible to the acids and sugars in your mouth. Within 24-48 hours your tooth’s enamel will re-mineralize and build up that protective fluoride-rich layer again. If you become a whitening junkie, and never give your enamel the chance to re-mineralize, then you can cause long term adverse effects to your teeth.

Question:
Which is a better way to whiten your teeth... using an In-Office or At-Home whitening system?
Answer:
In-office whitening (i.e. Zoom! or Britesmile) is a faster alternative for achieving that brighter smile, with a high degree of predictability. This method has been very popular with anyone whose free time is limited or who just wants instant gratification. Many times patients do the In-office whitening in combination with custom home trays. The home trays, when used beforehand, can be used to help condition the teeth for more dramatic In-office results. They can also be used for a period of time after an In-Office session in order to continue the whitening process, or to help lock in the shade that was achieved. It is recommended to keep your custom trays for periodic touch ups either before a big event, or to use a couple of times per year to maintain the shade you attained. In-office whitening procedures allow the dentist to whiten their patient's teeth up to 15 shades in about an hour (the average shade change being 8 shades). Some individuals may choose not to wear a custom tray if they are more hypersensitive or prone to a gag reflex.

Question:top
Is it better to wear my home whitening trays during the day or when I sleep at night?
Answer:
There are two basic options for home bleaching: daytime and nighttime intervals. Both forms of whitening involve wearing a customized, soft tray, which functions as a reservoir for the whitening gel. Patient compliance is usually better at night, although some people may not be able to tolerate going to sleep with these trays in their mouth. Night use affords the individual maximum benefit from each application because of the longer exposure time and diminished salivary flow. However, occasionally people may need to reduce the duration of their treatment as a result of sensitivity or personal preference. For these individuals, daytime wear is recommended for 1-2 hour intervals of treatment. It is imperative that your dentist professionally supervises this procedure, and that the whitening tray be custom made to ensure a perfect fit.

Question:
What is the difference between an over-the-counter whitening strip and pre-formed trays versus a custom tray made in the dental office?
Answer:
The importance of a custom-fitted tray cannot be over-emphasized; it allows for maximum patient comfort, reduces side effects, and maximizes efficacy. The over-the-counter versions may be ill-fitting and clumsy, or just may not cover all the desired tooth surfaces that you would want to whiten.

Question:
How long does teeth whitening last before I have to do it again?
Answer:
With good oral care the procedure's results may last over two years, and recent studies have shown that most patients experience only a one-shade regression after 6 months. Of course, those patients who smoke, drink dark teas and coffee, indulge in red wine and other readily staining foods and beverages are more likely to relapse sooner and require additional whitening sessions. Custom home-tray whitening usually tends to revert less than in-office techniques, but it takes longer to achieve desired results.

Question:
Who are the best candidates for teeth whitening?
Answer:
If your teeth are discoloured by the natural process of aging, the prognosis for a beautiful, youthful smile is excellent. Individuals with yellower teeth will typically have a more dramatic result than those with teeth that are greyer. Individuals with a more even toned layer of enamel will have a much more predictable result than those with tetracycline stains or white spot formations. The best candidates are those who are whitening their own natural tooth structure. Those patients with restorations of any type, within or covering their tooth structure (i.e. bonding, fillings, veneers, crowns, etc.), must realize that those areas will not whiten. They may choose to still undergo a whitening procedure, but with the understanding that they may require a new restoration in order to match the newly whitened shade.

Question:
Do I need to see my dentist first for a cleaning and exam before scheduling a whitening session?
Answer:
Yes. It is imperative that one's dentist performs a proper examination and diagnosis, in order to identify abscessed teeth, existing cavities, internal or external resorption, and other pathological problems before bleaching. Your dentist can help you to prevent the "corn-on-the-cob" effect (yellow tooth, white tooth, yellow tooth, etc.), by pointing out which of your teeth have restorations that will not whiten. A cleaning may be indicated to remove the plaque, tartar and extrinsic stains so that the whitening solutions can reach the tooth surface. A full series of x-rays and a detailed dental history should also help to determine if someone is more prone to having sensitive teeth.

Question:
How to I prevent my teeth from becoming too white?
Answer:
It is extremely difficult to get your teeth “too white” through In-Office or home whitening systems. Your teeth have a certain threshold that is difficult to get past with any dentist recommended whitening regimen. Many of these TV personalities and Movie Stars with the blindingly white smiles got that way not from whitening, but from poorly selecting a shade of porcelain (for their veneers, or crown and bridge work) that was way too white for their skin tones, and as a result it stands out like a sore thumb.

Question:top
Are there other alternatives to improving my smile other than whitening my teeth?
Answer:
Not everyone is a candidate for whitening. Bleaching is not recommended if you have tooth-coloured fillings, crowns, caps or bonding in your front teeth, as it will not change the colour of these materials, causing them to stand out in your newly whitened smile. The best long term alternative to achieving that picture-perfect white smile is having porcelain veneers, which can be made to become whatever shade you select. This is a much more costly procedure, and usually requires the reduction of some tooth structure (except in certain circumstances). Other alternatives include the use of lighter shade tooth-coloured bonded resin materials.

Question:
I have whitened my teeth before, but it doesn’t look like those actors on TV. What are they doing to get their teeth so white?
Answer:
Chances are you are looking at Porcelain Veneers, which are thin, porcelain “shells” that get permanently bonded to the front surface of your tooth. These veneers can eliminate large gaps between teeth, esthetically correct crowded and rotated teeth, and whiten ones smile to their desired shade.

Question:
What things should I avoid doing after teeth whitening and for how long?
Answer:
Anything that can stain a white T-shirt, such as red wine, coffee, tea, cola, teriyaki sauce, tomato sauce, etc. Stay bland in colour, and also try to have everything closer to room temperature to avoid sensitivity. Within 24 hours from when you completed your last whitening session, the pores of your teeth close, and that fluoride-rich layer will start to build again protecting the enamel. Once this happens you may have whatever you wish. Remember that stain is cumulative, and the more bland the diet, the longer lasting are the effects before you may require another whitening session.

Question:
Is there such a thing as over-whitening teeth?
Answer:
Yes. There are some whitening junkies or bleachaholics who do some form of teeth whitening virtually every day, and don’t give their enamel a chance to rest and remineralize. These individuals can damage their nerves and have needed root canals because they have over-bleached. You can also wear away some of the enamel from your teeth and cause them to become more translucent and unnatural. They can become blue or blue grey in colour. Remember, everything in moderation. It is a very safe, gratifying procedure when done as directed by your dentist.

Question:
How old does one have to be in order to have whitening performed on them?
Answer:
Most dentists will not perform an In-Office whitening session on the teeth of someone younger than fourteen years of age. In fact, many prefer to wait until they are closer to sixteen. If some compromise needs to be reached, the dentist may choose to fabricate custom whitening trays and give out a very low concentration gel, or recommend over-the-counter whitening strips or products that are milder and less effective.

Question:
Can I still whiten with sensitive teeth? And what can I do to make my teeth more comfortable?
Answer:
Most likely, but some determinations must be made first. You should see your dentist to make sure that this sensitivity isn’t stemming from some other underlying problem that would need to be addressed more urgently (i.e. a large cavity, fractured tooth, etc.). If there is nothing of an urgent nature, and the sensitivity is due to tooth grinding or clenching, gum recession, exposed root surfaces, etc., then precautions must be taken to make you as comfortable as possible while whitening. For example, the dentist could cover over any exposed root surfaces to protect from the whitening gels. Fluoride toothpastes can be prescribed for use before and after treatments. Desensitizing solutions can be applied either in the office or placed in your custom whitening tray at home, instead of the whitening gel. An over the counter pain medication can be used to help take the edge off the sensitivity if cleared by your dentist.

Question:orthodontist niagara falls
Does everyone get sensitivity when you whiten your teeth? And how long does the sensitivity last once you get it?
Answer:
Some patients may experience sensitivity throughout the treatment; others may not experience any sensitivity at all. Usually any sensitivity one may experience ceases within 24 hours from the termination of treatment. Older teeth have less sensitivity due to the nerves within the tooth becoming less prominent and migrating farther away from the outside surfaces. People with gum recession and root exposure may have more sensitivity due to the bleaching agents coming into contact with those exposed surfaces.

Question:
When I used my home whitening trays my gums got irritated? Is that normal?
Answer:
Your gums should not become irritated from home whitening treatments. If they do it is most likely due to one of the following reasons: (1) You may have placed too much gel inside the tray causing the excess to extrude onto your gums. You should only need a small teardrop of gel within each tooth reservoir of the tray; do not fill the tray. (2) The tray you were given may not have been properly contoured to the gum line. If this is the case you can ask your dentist to evaluate. (3) The concentration of gel may be too strong for you, in which case you should ask for a lower concentration gel. If the irritation persists after the above has been ruled out, then seek a consultation with your dentist to evaluate for other causes.

Question:
After I whitened my teeth, I noticed a bunch of white, blotchy spots all over my teeth... what is that? And what should I do to get rid of them?
Answer:
These white spots are due to a decalcification in the enamel. This may happen from a variety of reasons that include the enamel not forming properly during tooth development, and the acid break down of food debris from poor home care. Usually, if someone was not able to clean their teeth well during orthodontic treatment, the food debris would accumulate around the bracket, and the acids would attack that area more to try to break down the food. As a result, once the brackets were removed, white spots are evident around the area where the bracket used to be.

Question:
I have white spots on my teeth, will whitening still work?
Answer:
White spots are not removed with bleaching, although they may become less noticeable. If your teeth were dark to begin with, then bleaching may decrease the relative contrast of the white spots on your teeth. If there are any unsightly white spots that remain after whitening, you may choose to trough out those areas and replace it with tooth coloured bonding that blends with the newly lightened shade.

Question:
Why do teeth turn yellow?
Answer:
Teeth can turn yellow for a variety of reasons, including:

  • Aging (years of cumulative stain and the wear of the outer, white enamel layer of the teeth over time)
  • Heavy consumption foods and beverages that are more likely to stain (including: red wine, dark teas, coffee, vegetable juices, hot chocolate, soy sauce, etc.)
  • Smoking
  • Poor oral hygiene (which creates a thick coat of a yellowing plaque or tartar)
  • Heavy Grinding (which can wear away the enamel to reveal the yellower layer of tooth structure beneath)

Please note that the most common cause of this yellowing is due to poor brushing, which builds up this plaque and tartar, which is more likely to hold the stain than the tooth’s enamel. Once the teeth are cleaned, the yellow often disappears. Whitening is only effective for brightening the enamel itself, and will not do anything for teeth that are not properly cleaned.

Question:
I saw my dentist for an In-Office teeth whitening, but my teeth didn’t get much lighter. Does this happen to a lot of people? And are there other ways to whiten my teeth?
Answer:
Yes, there are a number of people who are more resistant to the effects of teeth whitening. It may happen because their teeth are greyer or perhaps they have tetracycline stained teeth. Whatever the reason, many of these individuals will still whiten quite well utilizing the deep bleaching technique. This technique involves conditioning the teeth on the first visit and slow, time-released exposure during at home wear of the customized whitening trays to create a deep cleansing effect to maximize the penetration of whitening agent into the enamel. After a couple of week of home whitening the patient is then given a full In-office whitening session to bring out the desired effect.

Question:
Do toothpastes with colour stain your teeth?
Answer:
Toothpastes that have colour will not stain your teeth generally. However, if you are in the process of undergoing whitening treatments, it is advised to use white toothpaste instead. Teeth can become more porous as a result of bleaching, and are subject to further whitening or staining. Within 24-48 hours after whitening is complete, the enamel regains that protective, fluoride-rich layer, and is not susceptible to the colours within the toothpaste. Additionally, once the toothpaste begins to foam, there is not much colour to saturate the teeth with.

Enamel Reshaping top

Question:
What is enamel reshaping (enameloplasty)?
Answer:
Enamel reshaping is the reshaping and contouring of the enamel (outer layer) of the teeth to remove sharp edges and uneven characteristics of the teeth, and to give the illusion that the teeth are straighter than they really are. This reshaping of the tooth’s enamel lends to an improvement of the overall appearance of a smile, correcting the flaws that catch one’s eye, such as a tooth that is longer than the others, or an obvious overlapping or rotation of the teeth due to crowding. Enamel reshaping is a conservative process, often combined with some bonding, does not require any anesthesia, and is relatively quick and painless.

Question:
Is enamel reshaping harmful to the teeth?
Answer:
Enamel reshaping is a very conservative and simple cosmetic procedure, but does remove some of your tooth’s enamel, which cannot be replaced. In many respects, enamel reshaping, when combined with teeth whitening and conservative bonding, can be the fastest, least invasive, and least expensive way to have a smile makeover. Granted not everyone is a candidate for this procedure, and many will require a more comprehensive smile makeover to achieve their goals (such as veneers, braces, implants, crown and bridge work, etc.). Often times, enamel reshaping is the intermediary step before committing to a full smile makeover.

Question:
Is everyone a candidate for enamel reshaping?
Answer:
While many people may be able to benefit from some degree of enamel reshaping, careful case selection is necessary to determine if this procedure is viable for the patient. Many times enamel reshaping in indicated for those people who want to soften the vampire-like points of their canines, or soften and round off sharp, pointy edges, or shorten teeth that appear too long. Very often, as people age, their teeth start to accumulate little chips and wear facets, which eventually cause the teeth to appear less attractive and misshaped. Selective reshaping of the enamel can help to create a more youthful and harmonious smile, but not everyone is a candidate. Individuals with existing restorations or very sensitive teeth may not be good candidates for this. If someone’s wear is due to teeth grinding (bruxism), then a night guard appliance would be indicated to prevent further wear, especially after reshaping the enamel. Additionally, if you are planning on having braces, it is recommended not to do any enamel reshaping beforehand, as the areas of the enamel that were modified may become more obvious once the teeth are more perfectly straight. If there are still some minor imperfections or sharp edges after orthodontics, then enamel reshaping may be indicated.

Question:
Do teeth become more sensitive after enamel reshaping?
Answer:
While most people will have little to no sensitivity from enamel reshaping, there are some whose teeth are very hypersensitive as a result of excessive wear or nerves that are closer to the surface. Your dentist should review your x-rays and assess your level of sensitivity before modifying your enamel. When the outer layer of enamel is reduced, the underlying enamel, once subjected to the oral environment, will function as the new outer layer. Once polished and treated with fluoride, the tooth will have less of a chance of becoming sensitive, and will not become any more prone to developing cavities.

Dental Bondingtop

Question:
What is bonding?
Answer:
Bonding uses composite resin to restore chipped or broken teeth, fill in gaps, fix cavities and reshape or recolor your smile. The same material used for bonding is used for making tooth coloured fillings, which appear more natural. Your dentist applies the resin and sculpts colours and shapes it to provide a pleasing result. A special light, operating at a specific wavelength, hardens the material, which is then adjusted and polished. Bonding differs from veneers in that bonding can be done within a single visit, while veneers require a dental lab to manufacture the restoration. Additionally, bonded restorations are much less expensive then veneering, since there are no lab costs involved. Bonded restorations are usually very conservative when it comes to reducing tooth structure, and can also be used to protect over exposed root surfaces in order to reduce tooth sensitivity.

Question:
How long does tooth bonding last?
Answer:
The answer depends on what the bonding was used for, where in the mouth was it placed, and how well it is cared for. If you place bonding on the biting edge of your front tooth, and like to chew on pen caps or bite your nails, then that bonding is not going to last long. Bonding will usually last for several years or more before needing to repair it, however, in some areas it can last for many more years with the proper care. Acid reflux and over imbibing in alcohol can weaken the bonded restorations. Teeth grinding can wear down these bonded restorations, but severe teeth grinding will also wear down your own enamel, along with silver fillings and porcelain restorations. With the proper care, bonding is a wonderful way to restore and improve your smile.

Question:
Why do teeth get discoloured?
Answer:
There are many factors that can affect the colour and appearance of your teeth. There are some people who are just born with teeth that are naturally more yellow than others. For example, many blonds and redheads have teeth that tend to be a little bit more on the yellow side due to their genetic makeup. Teeth will also become more yellow and grey with age. This occurs because over many years the enamel (the hard, white outer layer of a tooth) starts to wear down, becoming more transparent, and allowing the yellow colour of the underlying layer of tooth structure (dentin) to show through. Additionally, there are many other ways that teeth can discolour or stain over time. These can be broken down into two categories: Extrinsic and Intrinsic staining.

Extrinsic stains teeth are the stains that appear on the surface of the teeth as a result of years of consuming coffee, tea, red wine, colas, teriyaki sauce, fruit punch, vegetable juice, highly pigmented foods, and of course, tobacco use. The accumulation of tartar (from the plaque that hardened) will also cause teeth to appear discoloured. Superficial extrinsic stains can be readily removed from brushing, flossing and dental cleanings. Deeper stain will need to be bleached out.

Intrinsic stains come from when the actual tooth itself discolours. If someone was given the antibiotic tetracycline during the time when their teeth were forming, chances are they would develop a dark yellowish, brownish banding around the teeth. Excessive ingestion of fluoride can result in fluorosis, which is evident from the white spots that develop on the teeth. Additionally, tooth trauma can result in a colour change to the tooth, due to the nerve becoming damaged.orthodontist niagara falls